Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Trucking Bounces Back: Staying Ahead of the Flattened Curve

Trucking Bounces Back: Staying Ahead of the Flattened Curve

After months of disruption and apprehension about reduced volume the trucking industry is bouncing back. More industries are increasing production after six months of lockdowns for non-essential businesses, and they are relying on carriers to get products to their destinations. Despite the adversity of a global pandemic, there are two big reasons why trucking is staying ahead of the curve.

Adaptability in the Trucking Industry

Adaptability is necessary for the success of any business. When the pandemic hit the United States, certain businesses were categorized as non-essential, while others saw a major spike in production and sales. Similarly, the trucking industry saw demand diminish in certain areas and rise tremendously in others. Supply chains had to be reinforced to handle the demand for medical supplies, food, and toiletries. Physical entertainment, cars, and clothing took a backseat in both demand and production. In addition to supply chains, businesses – including carriers – physically adapted to new circumstances. Fashion houses turned their production over to creating masks for hospitals and communities. Manufacturers refitted machinery to produce medical equipment. Tanker trucks that carried grain alcohol for distilleries shifted things to carry the ingredients for liquid sanitizer, and so on.

Health-Focused Protocols

Adaptability in production is one thing, but protecting the workforce was also a top priority. After all, people are making, shipping, and hauling the products. New protocols had to be drafted and enacted to keep people safe from the factory to the store, and everywhere in between. Realizing that the economy depended on the trucking industry, carriers were among the first to institute masks, social distancing, and zero contact during shipment pick-up and delivery. The CDC even issued guidelines designed specifically for carriers and drivers to minimize the risk of infection. Overall, the freight industry was one of the safest among those that have workers traveling for a living.

Looking to the Future

As businesses come out of hibernation, the trucking industry will experience higher demands, and it is advised that safety protocols stay in place for the time being. In the near future, we may see a return to focusing on the need for more drivers in the industry as the economy fully reopens.

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